Myofascial Trigger Point Dry Needling

WHAT IS TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING

Trigger Point Dry Needling involves placing a small needle into the muscle at the trigger point which is typically in an area which is tight and maybe tender, with the intent of causing the muscle to contract and then release, improving flexibility of the muscle and therefore decreasing symptoms. It is also known as Medical Acupuncture, however they are two different techniques. In Chinese acupuncture, the needles are inserted along meridians to treat diseases. Whereas, when Dry Needling the needles are inserted right into the myofascial trigger points which are knots in muscles.

BENEFITS

Decreased pain both locally and into referral sites

Improved muscle function (ability to contract and relax appropriately)

Decreased muscular tension and improved myofascial flexibility

Improved ability to move and function for daily activities

RISKS

Like any treatments, there are possible complications, however they are very rare. The most serious risk of Trigger Point Dry Needling is accidental puncture of a lung (pneumothorax). If this were to happen, it may require a chest x-ray and no further treatment as it can resolve on its own. As the needles used are very small and do not have a cutting edge, the likelihood of any significant tissue trauma from Dry Needling is unlikely.

HOW YOU MAY FEEL DURING AND AFTER DRY NEEDLING

Drowsiness may occur after treatment, if affected, you are not advised to drive

Fatigue after treatment

Possible minor bleeding or bruising 

Possible pain during treatment especially under the foot 

Existing symptoms can get worse after treatment, if so, inform the therapist

Fainting can occur in certain clients, particularly the first treatment

WHAT TO DO AFTER TREATMENT

Drink loads of water to reduce soreness

Use ice for any soreness

If you don’t like ice, you can use a heat pack to alleviate any discomfort

Avoid Strenuous exercise activities to the treated muscles

DRY NEEDLING CAN HELP IF YOU HAVE ANY OF THESE CONDITIONS

Back Pain

Shoulder Pain

Neck Pain

Tennis Elbow 

Golfer’s Elbow

Gluteal Pain

Sciatica

Knee Pain

Achilles Tendonitis

Plantar Fasciitis

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