Golfer’s Elbow

Overview:

Golfer’s elbow, a.k.a medial epicondylitis is when there’s inflammation on the tendons of the inner forearm muscles of the elbow joint. Although it is similar to Tennis Elbow it’s not as common. Pain can sometimes radiate down into the forearm.

What causes Golfer’s elbow?

The repetitive stress applied to these tendons of the inner forearm muscles lead to microscopic tears that eventually cause inflammation and pain. Golfer’s elbow is triggered by activities that involve repeated gripping, lifting or twisting the hand and wrist. It can also be caused by overhead throwing activities.

Activities that may trigger tennis elbow include:

  • Playing tennis and other racquet sports
  • Golfing
  • Throwing Sports
  • Rock Climbing
  • Weight Training

Symptoms:

Symptoms do vary between patients.

The most commonly experienced signs and symptoms include:

  • Pain on the inside of the elbow
  • Pain on the bony point of the joint
  • The triggering of pain when turning a door handle or opening jars
  • A weak grip

Treatment:

Rest – allowing your elbow to recover is the most effective treatment for golfer’s elbow since inflammation needs time to fully subside.

Using ice packs – similar to other injuries, applying cold packs on the site of pain can significantly improve your symptoms. Apply ice to the affected area up to six times a day, 15 minutes at a time.

Pharmacological drugs – Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (e.g., ibuprofen) are also effective in reducing pain and swelling. Discuss with your Pharmacist.

Physical therapy – this treatment involves the strengthening of your forearm muscles to promote healing. Physical therapy uses exercises, massages, dry needling and other techniques to stimulate the muscles.

Takeaway message:

Strengthening your forearm muscles do not only treat, but can help prevent Golfer’s elbow. Once you suspect you might be suffering from Golfer’s elbow, modify your activities immediately to reduce pain. If you push through the pain, it will only get worse.

Hopefully, this article managed to shed some light on golfer’s elbow. If the symptoms persist, contact us. We’ll be happy to help you through your physical therapy journey.

Sports Massage Aftercare.

What to expect after a Sports Massage

Sports massage has many benefits, both physical and psychological. Massage improves blood circulation, stimulates lymphatic flow, improves tissue flexibility and helps breakdown scar tissue.

After having a massage, it is common to experience the following:

  • Fatigue
  • Blocked or Runny Nose
  • Muscle Tenderness
  • Bruising
  • Thirst
  • Headache 
  • Increased Urination

To get the most out of your treatment we recommend you do the following after your treatment:

  • Drink Plenty of water
  • Rest as much as possible
  • Avoid direct heat on skin
  • Avoid strenuous exercise for 24hrs
  • Avoid alcohol for 12hrs
  • Apply ice (wrapped in cloth) to sore areas

Tennis Elbow: Causes, Symptoms and Treatments

Overview

Tennis elbow is a common injury that affects the elbow joint, leading to inflammation and pain. The scientific community refers to this condition as lateral epicondylitis, which is the result of repetitive stress.

Since the lateral (i.e., outside) region of the elbow gets affected, patients mostly sense pain in that particular side.

In this article, we will briefly cover the causes, symptoms, and treatment options of tennis elbow.

What causes tennis elbow?

In general, tendons comprise the connection between muscles and bones. In the forearm, the tendons connect the muscles to the outer side of the elbow.

Unfortunately, the repetitive stress applied to these tendons leads to microscopic tears that eventually cause inflammation and pain.

The most commonly affected tendons belong to the extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle.

Activities that may trigger tennis elbow include:

  • Playing tennis and other racquet sports
  • Golfing
  • Swimming
  • The frequent use of screwdrivers, hammers, or computers
  • Turning a key

What are the symptoms of tennis elbow?

Similar to other musculoskeletal injuries, the frequency and severity of tennis elbow symptoms vary between patients.

The most commonly experienced signs and symptoms include:

  • Persistent elbow pain that gradually worsens
  • Painful radiation to the outer side of the forearm and wrist
  • The triggering of pain when shaking someone’s hand or squeezing objects
  • A weak grip

The treatment options of tennis elbow

The treatment options of tennis elbow can be divided into two categories:

Non-surgical treatments

According to reports, 80–95% of tennis elbow cases heal without the need for complex surgical procedures.

To treat this condition, your doctor may recommend the following approaches:

Rest – allowing your elbow to recover is the most effective treatment for tennis elbow since inflammation needs time to fully subside. If you cannot do this on your own, your doctor may use braces to immobilize the affected muscles.

Using ice packs – similar to other injuries, applying cold packs on the site of inflammation can significantly improve your symptoms.

Pharmacological drugs – Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (e.g., ibuprofen, aspirin) are also effective in reducing pain and swelling.

Physical therapy – this treatment involves the strengthening of your forearm muscles to promote healing. Physical therapy uses exercises, massages, and other techniques to stimulate the muscles.

Steroid injections – injecting corticosteroids into the affected muscle can significantly temper down the inflammation, which eventually improves your symptoms.

Surgical treatments

Surgical procedures are left as a last resort when it comes to tennis elbow.

Generally speaking, your doctor may consider surgery when you are not responding to conventional treatments after one year.

The primary two approaches to surgically treat tennis elbow include:

Arthroscopy-mediated surgery – using a scope, your surgeon will remove the damaged tissue and make new attachments between the muscles and bones.

Open surgery – as the name implies, this technique involves making a large incision to perform the surgery.

According to statistics, 80–90% of surgeries are successful.

Takeaway message

Tennis elbow is an extremely common condition that ranges in severity from completely benign to debilitating.

Hopefully, this article managed to shed some light on tennis elbow. If you still have unanswered questions, please don’t hesitate to contact us .

Myofascial Trigger Point Dry Needling

WHAT IS TRIGGER POINT DRY NEEDLING

Trigger Point Dry Needling involves placing a small needle into the muscle at the trigger point which is typically in an area which is tight and maybe tender, with the intent of causing the muscle to contract and then release, improving flexibility of the muscle and therefore decreasing symptoms. It is also known as Medical Acupuncture, however they are two different techniques. In Chinese acupuncture, the needles are inserted along meridians to treat diseases. Whereas, when Dry Needling the needles are inserted right into the myofascial trigger points which are knots in muscles.

BENEFITS

Decreased pain both locally and into referral sites

Improved muscle function (ability to contract and relax appropriately)

Decreased muscular tension and improved myofascial flexibility

Improved ability to move and function for daily activities

RISKS

Like any treatments, there are possible complications, however they are very rare. The most serious risk of Trigger Point Dry Needling is accidental puncture of a lung (pneumothorax). If this were to happen, it may require a chest x-ray and no further treatment as it can resolve on its own. As the needles used are very small and do not have a cutting edge, the likelihood of any significant tissue trauma from Dry Needling is unlikely.

HOW YOU MAY FEEL DURING AND AFTER DRY NEEDLING

Drowsiness may occur after treatment, if affected, you are not advised to drive

Fatigue after treatment

Possible minor bleeding or bruising 

Possible pain during treatment especially under the foot 

Existing symptoms can get worse after treatment, if so, inform the therapist

Fainting can occur in certain clients, particularly the first treatment

WHAT TO DO AFTER TREATMENT

Drink loads of water to reduce soreness

Use ice for any soreness

If you don’t like ice, you can use a heat pack to alleviate any discomfort

Avoid Strenuous exercise activities to the treated muscles

DRY NEEDLING CAN HELP IF YOU HAVE ANY OF THESE CONDITIONS

Back Pain

Shoulder Pain

Neck Pain

Tennis Elbow 

Golfer’s Elbow

Gluteal Pain

Sciatica

Knee Pain

Achilles Tendonitis

Plantar Fasciitis

Forward Head Posture

Neck-Pain-Exercise-Leaflet

Forward Head Posture – Neck Pain

There is a lot of information out there on neck pain and the main causes. The one I want to look at on this blog is Forward Head Posture, as it is one of the causes of neck pain. This is for you office workers and everyone else who spend long periods of time hunched over your computers, phones or any other gadgets you love to use.

What’s Forward Head Posture
Forward head posture is when the neck moves forward, placing the head in front of the shoulders rather than directly above. This actually increases the weight of your head which in turn causes neck & back pain, headaches, migranes and other health problems. If you spend a lot of time on a computer, tablet or smartphone you are most likely to end up adopting this poor posture. 

How to fix forward head posture.

  • Reorganise your work station – adjust your chair, your elbows should be at a 90º angle when you rest your arms on your desk. Feet should be flat on the floor and the top third of your screen should be at eye level.
  • Take regular breaks – move around and stretch your neck every few hours.
  • Avoid carrying heavy bags – to reduce strain on your neck.
  • Soft Tissue Mobilisation – to release trigger points.
  • Neck Muscle Stretch – to improve range of movement.
  • Chest Muscle Stretch – to improve upright posture by moving the head and shoulders back.
  • Resistance Training – to activate the muscles that run from the shoulder blade to the neck and skull.
 
 

Osgood-Schlatter Disease

What is Osgood-Schlatter Disease?

Osgood-Schlatter disease is not as bad as it sounds. It is characterised by the inflammation of the area just below the knee cap at the bony bump at the top of the shin bone (tibial tubercle). This is where the knee tendon (patella tendon)  attaches to the  top of the shinbone (tibia). The condition was named after Robert Osgood, an American orthopaedic surgeon and Carl Schlatter, a Swiss surgeon who described the disease. 

Osgood-Schlatter disease is a common cause of knee pain in active adolescents. It is an overuse injury, thus, it is caused by repetitive actions that put too much stress on bones and muscle. Osgood-Schlatter Disease can affect one or both knee.

Who gets Osgood-Schlatter Disease?

Osgood-Schlatter’s disease usually affects children who are having a growth spurt, between the ages of 9 and 16 years. It usually affects children that are involved in sporting activities particularly running and jumping sports. However, children who do not participate in sports can also suffer from Osgood Schlatter Disease. 

Signs and Symptoms

  • Anterior knee Pain
  • Swelling
  • Pain increases with activities
  • Pain decreases with rest
  • Pain is typically over the the bony bump at the top of your shin bone (tibial tubercle

Physical Therapy Treatment 

  • Applying Ice to the area to reduce pain and inflammation
  • Modification of sporting activities depending on the severity of the pain
  • Stretching Exercises
  • Strengthening Exercises

If you think your child might be suffering from Osgood-Schlatter Disease, Seek advice from your GP or a therapist for proper diagnosis and rehabilitation.